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Lesson 5 Numbers 11-99

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Now you can count from 0-10, do you know that with some basic logic of forming bigger Chinese numbers, you should be able to count from 11-99 at this moment already? It’s very simple. Watch the video and find out how.

Now you can count from 0-10, do you know that with some basic logic of forming bigger Chinese numbers, you should be able to count from 11-99 at this moment already? It’s very simple. Watch the video and find out how.

Comments (126)

Hi, when I am at the restaurant and I want to pay my meal, how do I say for example $15.50?
Eli 2 months 3 weeks ago
Hi Eli! A 毛 (máo) is 10 'cents' so you would say 十五块五毛钱 (shí wǔ kuài wǔ máo qián). Hope that helps!
Jason at Yoyo Chinese 2 months 3 weeks ago
I think that "qián" is money but "kuài" stands for what???
Eli 1 month 3 weeks ago
Hi Eli! Both kuài and máo are measure words for different amount of qián/money. Kuài = the measure word for 'dollars', whereas 'máo' is measure word for 10 cents. So 1 dollar = yí kuài qián, and 50 cents = wǔ máo qián. And finally, $1.50 = 'yí kuài wǔ máo qián'. Definitely let me know if you still have questions though!
Jason at Yoyo Chinese 1 month 3 weeks ago
Awesome explanation!!! No more question on that but, can you give me an English-Chinese dictionary link? I really need a good one... I hope you can help me and again thanks for your excellent answer.
Eli 1 month 3 weeks ago
Subtle but brilliant using the stylised date block image in the months explanation. It is an excellent mnemonic for the yue character. Very clever. You are awesome Yang Yang.
Ramsdale 2 months 4 weeks ago
Ni3 ha3o ya1ng ya1ng, Maybe I am jumping ahead, I have questions related to the pronunciations of (r), (p)/(b) and (t)/(d): in the wors "er4", it sound like english "r", but in the word "re2n" it sounds like english "j" I am confused how to pronounce (p) and (b) in different words as well as (t) and (d) Xie4 Xie4
AJ NOURI 10 months 2 weeks ago
Hi Chinese pinyin is definitely pronounced differently from English! For more info you can check out our Pinyin Course, or follow allow the Beginner Conversational Study Guide, and it'll take you through the Pinyin Course too.
Jenny at Yoyo Chinese 10 months 2 weeks ago
Hello Elizabeth, from Florida:)! You are right, we use the ordinal numbers only before nouns in the singular (except for after "first" like in "The first days" or "the first cars to be invented"), so that does limit their use a bit. By the way, have you noticed that Russian is interesting in that it has a plural form for the word "one"? The word is "odni"! Kuai le!
lingoguy73 1 year 2 weeks ago
Hello from Moscow))) How often do chinese people use ordinal numbers? We don't do it in English very often.
Elizabeth Kapustina 1 year 3 months ago
Just a heads up, the 'review with lesson 4 vocabulary' listed in the last section of week 1, day 5 lesson is actually a 'numbers 0-10' download.
codybousc 1 year 6 months ago
That's right! :) Even though its day 5, it's your chance to go back review the previous lesson to stay sharp! You'll review today's lesson under week 2, day 1.
Jenny at Yoyo Chinese 1 year 6 months ago
That makes sense ;)
codybousc 1 year 6 months ago
大家好!我叫安美我生日是九月十號。
annemiek96 1 year 6 months ago
很高兴认识你,安美!(hěn gāo xìng rèn shi nǐ ān měi) - Nice to meet you, An Mei! :)
Micah at Yoyo Chinese 1 year 6 months ago
您们好! I believe if you practice writing the numbers one through 99, saying them aloud and writing them in pinyin is great practice. And then do it in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th way while also eventually writing them in pinyin and I promise you that you will have come across every tonal form of speech in Chinese. That's what I did, and it helped me hear it but you have to annunciate every character. YĪ , ÈR , SĀN! .. DÌ YĪ GE, DÌ ÈR GE。 一,二,三。,第 一 个, 第 二 个。
塞尔吉奥 1 year 9 months ago
Absolutely. Great practice indeed. Keep up the good work. :)
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 9 months ago
If "月" means month, how would you say something for a duration of months? As in, "I lived there for three months" or "It took three months". Because "三月" would mean March, would it not?
cayleighj 1 year 10 months ago
You just need to insert a measure word in there to make it a duration: 三个月
Corey 1 year 10 months ago
Ahhh, that's simple, thank you!
cayleighj 1 year 10 months ago
我的生日是十月二十四号。对吗?
Alex Casey 2 years 2 months ago
说得很好 (shuō de hěn hǎo) - very well said. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 2 months ago
Hi dear yangyang. Can you write "Farzaneh" in chinese character? FARZANEH means "wise" in Persian. This is a female name. Thank you.
roosta 2 years 3 months ago
Hi Dear Yangyang , I can see That There are a few persian's Studying Mandarin Here , I Appreciate it if you Make a Chinese name from my Persian name (Bardia) too,Thank you.
Bardia 1 year 9 months ago
Bardia may be translated as 巴尔迪亚 (bā ěr dí yà), based on how it may sounds. :)
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 9 months ago
Hi Farzaneh. Your name may be translated as 法尔扎内 (fǎ ěr zhā nèi) in Chinese. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 3 months ago
我的生日是第八。
Kazuke Li 2 years 3 months ago
Did you mean your birthday is on the eighth? It should be 我的生日是八号 (wǒ de shēng rì shì bā hào). Since you are not ranking the dates, you do not need to use 第 (dì).
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 3 months ago
第五课。 对吗
Kazuke Li 2 years 3 months ago
是的 (shì de) - Yes. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 3 months ago
我喜欢你的课。
Kazuke Li 2 years 3 months ago
https://www.random.org/ Useful for practicing! Just set for a random number between 0 and 99 and try to say the number it generates. :)
Brody Attwater 2 years 4 months ago
Thanks for sharing. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 4 months ago
Ni hao, Yàngyàng, this is my first week doing the course and I am delighted. Learning Chinese does not look like an impossible thing now. I am surprised to see how logical Chinese language is. Xiè xie. Juanjo.
Juanjoerrea 2 years 4 months ago
That's awesome. Have fun studying with us! :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 4 months ago
I'm getting confused a little with the pronunciation of yi.. Is it 'yee' or 'ee' because I hear it differently each time. Also, thank you for your classes. :)
Bronte 2 years 4 months ago
It should be 'yee'. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 4 months ago
I am having trouble pronouncing shí correctly. Any tips? Also I can't figure out the difference between pronouncing shi and she. Please help me :3
marcel961 2 years 4 months ago
The main thing to remember about "shi" is that it sounds like "shr." And "she" sounds like "shuh." You need to open your mouth to pronounce the "uh" sound at the end of "she," but most people pronounce "shi" without really moving their jaw. Be sure to check out the pinyin chart. You can click on the "shi" cell in the upper right-hand corner and listen to it as many times as needed in each of the tones, and then do the same for "she," which is six cells below "shi" in the same column.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 4 months ago
Yangyang how do i say i was born on may 5th in chinese ?
pires 2 years 8 months ago
You may say, wǒ shì wǔ yuè wǔ hào chū shēng de 我是五月五号出生的. You may also say, wǒ de shēng rì shì wǔ yuè wǔ hào 我的生日是五月五号 My birthday is on May 5th.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 7 months ago
so you don't change the 4th tone to a 2nd tone in er when saying december (shi2 er4 yue4)?
jesseandreas 2 years 8 months ago
No, you don't. The tone change rule only applies to bu4 不. If it's followed by another 4th tone, 不 should be pronounced as bu2.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 8 months ago
Hi yangyang: many of your replies are incorrect and seemed to be rushed without much thinking before answering. After I submitted my question on the different pronunciation of number one, I did a google search and found the following answer: In mainland China, people usually use "yao" when reading numerical serial numbers, digit by digit. One typical application is the phone number. In almost all other cases, only "yi" is used. Its origin is military usage.
mcchow 2 years 9 months ago
Hi mcchow. We are so sorry for the misunderstanding. Yes, the number one is sometime pronounced as "yāo", not "yōu". You are right, it's typically used when reading a numerical serial numbers, such phone number, bar code numbers. One of the reason that yāo is used is to avoid the confusion between "yī" and "qī", the numbers 1 and 7. Hope that helps. Feel free to let us know if you have any further question.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 9 months ago
Hey, easy there. Your original question wasn't phrased right - it's "yao" not "you" - so you seem to be expecting the team to read between the lines to a degree. Also, you should be aware that it's not just Yangyang answering questions; you may get an answer from one of several different team members, so be prepared for somewhat different takes on any particular question.
Corey 2 years 9 months ago
Hi yangyang: I noticed that mainland Chinese often pronounce one as "Yōu". When is "Yī" used and when is"Yōu" used? Thank you. I really enjoyed your lessons.
mcchow 2 years 9 months ago
Glad that you enjoyed the lessons. It may be a dialect accent. It should be pronounced as "Yī" though.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 9 months ago
Hi yangyang! I would like to listen to the classes on the go, is there a yoyochinese application? Transferring all the audio file on my iPhone will need lots of memory. Thanks for your help!
gabriele tedeschi 2 years 9 months ago
You could transfer them in batches of 20 at a time, and then delete them off of your phone when you are finished with them. The audio review files are about 8MB each, so 20 of them is about 160MB. A typical smartphone has at least 8GB of memory, so 160MB will occupy only 2% of the smartphone's storage capacity.
Corey 2 years 9 months ago
That's a great suggestion. Sorry, currently, we don't have an app for our site, but that's something we look forward to in the future.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 9 months ago
Hello Yàngyàng so far I am really enjoying your course, well it's only been a week, but I review pretty much all the time with the audio Whenever I walk my dogs, at the gym, in my car, in bed. I look like a crazy person talking to myself in the streets :) except my pronunciation is probably leaning towards French or English ( I am a French native speaker) my BD is on March 21st in Chinese you wouldn't say 21st right but 21 March so èr shí yī sān yuė is it correct? thanks Lê Chi
mandarin21 2 years 9 months ago
Hi Lê Chi, thank you so much for choosing Yoyo Chinese. We are glad that you are enjoying our course. March 21st in Chinese is sān yuė èr shí yī hào. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 9 months ago
Since first time I saw you in youtube I just knew you are"the One",pretty,funny and specially very very clear and easy to understand. Thanks a lot for all the work you put in this matter,helping us to understand and enjoy the Chinese language. Alberto
Teamy 2 years 10 months ago
Thank you so much for the nice comments. We really appreciate your support! :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 10 months ago
I really like ur videos and it's so clear...well, I am not a english native speaker, but my english is pretty well. Actually my native language is portuguese and I am glad to have started learning english... it makes me find a really nice teacher who can teach me and make me understand Chinese with an easy way to learn it... thx a lot
jpaulinhop 2 years 10 months ago
nice Job yang yang... I am really surprised from Your work ..I am afraid from you. when i look at You then i feel like falling in love. i know i am wrong that's the truth. You are really nice. I will not say wo ai ni because you not know who is really impressed from You. As respect You as my laoshi... xie xie laoshi.. Wo shi ni de xin xue sheng.
Imran khan 2 years 11 months ago
Thank you so much for the nice comments, Imran. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 11 months ago
wo ai ni Cheng <3
Alvi 2 years 11 months ago
want to master Chinese so i could visit china :)
Alvi 2 years 11 months ago
Cool! Good luck with your studies! :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 11 months ago
Good i am learning..
aalagars@yahoo.com 2 years 11 months ago
Awesome! :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 11 months ago
Good i am learning..
aalagars@yahoo.com 2 years 11 months ago
Is number 12 the only number that you fully stop after shi before saying er? At least it sounds like you stop rather than carrying the sound before saying er.
Valerie 2 years 12 months ago
Hmm, not really. It depends on the pace how you would like to say it. You don't actually have to come to a full stop before saying er.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 11 months ago
Could you perhaps add links in the comments below when you reference a previous class or Google hang out?
Coker 3 years 2 weeks ago
Thank you for the suggestion.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 11 months ago
I get an error (file not found) when I click on Download Lecture Notes.
RonB 3 years 3 weeks ago
Yay! The lecture notes are back online! Hope you come back to check 'em out now :) If there are anymore problems, shoot us another comment.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 3 weeks ago
The lecture notes for all lessons are down right now. We're so sorry for the inconvenience. Our team is working quickly, and the problem should be fixed by tomorrow. Thank you for your patience.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 3 weeks ago
Hi Yangyang! I was wondering, should the "y" be pronounced in "yi" like it is in "yeah"? Sometimes I hear the "y" and other times I do not. Thank you!
Zachary C 3 years 4 weeks ago
So far so good. Thanks a lot. Very clear.
Jared Hendricks Inglés 3 years 1 month ago
By the 'you' sound I mean the English 'you' sound.
Bilchick 3 years 1 month ago
The video says that yu in 'yue' is not a word in English. Isn't it just the 'you' sound?
Bilchick 3 years 1 month ago
Not exactly like the "you" sound in English. It more like "yea", but with rounding lips like a fish "yu". Please refer to pinyin lesson 11 @ time 2:20 for the correct sound.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 1 month ago
Extremely good! I've enjoyed the lesson and learnt so much. Thank you!
Swee ling 3 years 1 month ago
Hei! How to say one month, without saying January, which is literally one month? Xie xie ;)
przemyslaw.filipiak 3 years 1 month ago
One month is 一个月 yi2 ge yue4. :)
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 1 month ago
Ni hao Yoyo... I am beginner in your class, I figured that your birth day is in July. but I do not know which day! anyway, happy birth day to you and I wish the best for you .... thanks for your great teaching...
farzi 3 years 1 month ago
Thank you so much for the birthday wishes. It's July 9. :) Thank you so much support.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 1 month ago
Should the "yi" which comes before "yue" in "January" be pronounced with a first tone? I thought it was normally pronounced with a second tone in front of fourth-tone words. Thanks.
Kusterdu 3 years 1 month ago
Yes, you are right about the tone change for yi when it's followed by a fourth tone. However, when you are counting number, such as yi, er, san, or yi yue, er yue, san yue, or di yi, di er, di san,... yi is pronounced in first tone. Please check out our Google hangout lesson 4 for more details about tone change rules.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 1 month ago
thx
giovanni 3 years 1 month ago
Hi, It's really helpful, thanks. I have few friends who are from Australia. They stuck with "yue4" which is mean month. They pronounced "yue4" sounds like two separate sounds, like "yu-e". They couldn't make it into one sound. Did u have any suggestion?
Jh 3 years 2 months ago
This is really common for beginners. It is, after all, two vowel sounds. The main thing is to make sure the two sounds are both being pronounced correctly (and not like "yu-ei," which is a really common mistake), and eventually they will be able to say it more fluently.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 2 months ago
thank you very much you've just helped me by tellyng me the word 'dí'.
paloma.gm 3 years 3 months ago
glad that you found it helpful. :)
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 3 months ago
I was reading "Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell. In it, it discusses the myth that Asians are much better than westerners in math. He unravels the myth by explaining that it's mostly due to the asian/chinese numbering system which is infinitely less complicated than English. When adding 22 + 13, we have to basically resort to mental math or memorization. But the Chinese child thinks: 20 and 2 + 10 and 3 = 30 and 5 = 35. The vocabulary of the word makes it so much easier - now I understand it!
Fazzio 3 years 5 months ago
I think I am oversimplifying too! It's not just rote memorization, but also lots of drilling on skills,... in general a lot of repetition.
Corey 3 years 5 months ago
You may be right... you know more about Chinese than I do! He also made the point that English has a ton of bizarre and out of place exceptions. For example, we say thirteen not three-teen. But we do say fourteen. But then not five-teen, but rather fifteen. Then six, seven, eight, nineteen all follow the pattern again. Forty, sixty and eighty make sense, but twenty? thirty?
Fazzio 3 years 5 months ago
But in Chinese, mostly I think, the exceptions are not as common? You mentioned memorization. Gladwell talks briefly about that too - it's easier to memorize and retain in Asian languages because of shorter words that can be said more quickly. He gives the example of si and qi - can be said in less than 1/4 of a second. Four and Seven take comparably longer, 1/3 of a second. Takes more mental space. Thus memorization is easier for Asian language speakers. Fascinating huh?
Fazzio 3 years 5 months ago
And the prerequisites are education. The parents are well aware of this and they want the children to be successful (and for other reasons as well). Generalizing, they place greater pressure on their kids to succeed in school. That may mean assigning them additional homework to do, looking at their work before it's turned in for errors, pushing them into certain fields and away from others. There is less emphasis on what makes the child happy, and more on what will make them succeed in life.
Corey 3 years 5 months ago
You may be right, but the fact of the matter is that they do devote a lot of time to memorizing, whereas we devote very little to it. So if those shorter words give them a slight advantage, I think the fact that they actually spend a lot of time at it is a greater factor. The other thing I neglected to mention, but seems to be very important, is that in many Asian countries, life is very competitive. Competition for jobs means there is competition for the prerequisites to get the job (cont'd)
Corey 3 years 5 months ago
I think Mr. Gladwell may be oversimplifying a bit on this point. From my observations, the difference has more to do with the teaching style in China (and other Asian countries) that relies muxh more on rote memorization, than on understanding the concepts. Perhaps their teachers believe that the memorization must come first, and provides the basis for the theory later. I have seen two documentaries where part of them show the way students are taught in China, and it's quite surprising.
Corey 3 years 5 months ago
Thanks so much, if February is er yue, what if i want to say two months?
ywzx 3 years 7 months ago
That would be liang3 ge yue4. We use liang3 for two when refer to quantities.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 7 months ago
YUE2 sounds kinda like youre saying yuek! as in gross!
Clawpaw 3 years 8 months ago
Ni Hao Yang Yang I wrote a dialogue here it is: ni3 men N hao3 ba4 ba4, ma1 ma1 zao3 shang2 hao3 Clawpaw and then I wrote wo3 shi4 you3 xue1 sheng ta1 shi4 ma1 ma1
Clawpaw 3 years 8 months ago
Hi Melissa, sorry, we are a bit confused about the last part of your dialogue. Did you mean I am a student, and she's my mother? In that case, you3 is not needed. :)
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 8 months ago
Dear yang yang, does di yi di er di San, also comes with tonal change rules? For example, di si the di has to change into 2 tone? Thanks for answering my question.
Dudu 3 years 9 months ago
There's no change in tones for these. di is still pronounced in fourth tone.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 9 months ago
Yangyang, thank you so much for the way you teach us - it penetrates and stays in there. Your lessons are the most enjoyable ones of whatever I have experienced up to now. God bless you and keep you safe. 耶穌基督愛你。他是神和神的兒子。感謝您
Yeshua 3 years 9 months ago
Thank you so much for your nice comments. Keep up with the good works! God bless you.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 9 months ago
I don't catch the difference in pronunciation between di4 si4 or qi1 and si4 or shi2 xiie
normandb21 3 years 9 months ago
di sounds "dee" in indeed, qi sounds like "chee" in cheese. It's a bit hard to pronounce si4 and shi4. One way to distinguish these two is that si4 you need to flatten your tongue, where shi2 you curl your tongue a bit. Would you please refer to our Pinyin lesson 12-14? Yangyang also had a google hangout session that cover the si and shi sounds. Please check out this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=if9UTOvQkJo&noredirect=1. Hope you find it helpful.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 9 months ago
the video stops at the number 21 and it will not go beyond it. this video stops every time at 1 min. 10 sec. thank you for your attention in this matter.
tmogy50 3 years 11 months ago
Easy for me. The u from yue is the exact same pronunciation as the french u. Chinese is easier when you're french... who would have thought ! :D
Sebroy 3 years 12 months ago
That's great to hear! Thank you for sharing Sebroy. :)
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 11 months ago
I have a question about number one, "yi", when it begins a word combination, like "yi yue" it sounds more like "i yue", but when "yi" follows in a word combination, "di yi" it sounds like it retains the "y", whereas in the former example it seems as if the "y" drops from "yi" to make a solid "i" only sound. Am I hearing this right? Or I am missing the "y" or is it just really really soft? Please help!
LanguageGuy 3 years 12 months ago
For "yi yue", the "yi" should pronounce second tone. There's a rule of change in tones for the number one "yi". If it's follow by a fourth tone, the tone of "yi" change to 2nd tone. Both "yi" in "yi yue" and "di yi" should sound the same, retain the "y", except the first "yi" is 2nd tone.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 11 months ago
Hi, the audio can not been heard and downloaded, Mariana
mariana.delvalle.161 3 years 12 months ago
We just looked into the lesson and it seems to play fine and downloadable. Would you please try again maybe with a new window or browser? Let us know if the problem still exists. Thanks.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 12 months ago
Hi, the audio can not been heard and downloaded, Mariana
mariana.delvalle.161 3 years 12 months ago
That's good
Sunmeiyu 4 years 3 months ago
That's great
Abrar 4 years 3 months ago
very interesting. thanx
karara 4 years 4 months ago
Can I say numbers like 33 and 99 with the shi2 being a neutral tone? San1shi0san1 and jiu3shi0jiu3. 30 remains san1shi2
EugeneK 4 years 8 months ago
Yes, colloquially, I do hear other Chinese people say that. I personally don't like to do that but it does happen. :)
Yoyo Chinese Development 4 years 8 months ago
Thank you. So basically, either pronunciation is correct and you just use whichever roll off your tongue better in a particular sentence right?
noguchihideyo 5 years 2 months ago
It's better to pronounce it with the "y" at the beginning, because it sounds a bit better for some reason. If you don't, we will understand you anyway.
Yoyo Chinese Development 5 years 2 months ago edited
I hear in this video that when a word starts with 'yi', you pronounce it as 'ee' but when it comes at the end (e.g. san shi yi), you pronounce it like 'yee'. Is this some kind of a pronunciation rule? Thank you.
noguchihideyo 5 years 2 months ago
Hi noguchihideo, you have really good ears. As I mentioned in the previous lesson, Chinese people don't distinguish sounds with "y" or without "y" so much and that's the reason why lots of Chinese people have trouble telling the words "ear" and "year" apart, myself included. :)
Yoyo Chinese Development 5 years 2 months ago edited
So what is your rule, pronouncing the Yi as ee at the beginning of a sentence and Yee after it follows another word? Is that why it sounds like you see ee when you are counting?
Valerie 2 years 12 months ago
There is no rule for this. I know that they sound really different to you, but for Chinese people, there really is no distinguishable difference between "yee" and "ee". So just be prepared to hear it both ways. And you can choose for yourself which way to say it.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 11 months ago
Outstanding
curiosa 5 years 2 months ago
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