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Lesson 25 Pinyin Review - Part 4

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In this lesson, continue your comprehensive review of pinyin with part four of six. Specifically, you'll cover some potentially tricky pinyin sounds that look completely different on paper, but actually rhyme when you speak them out loud.
Lesson Audio Review
In this lesson, continue your comprehensive review of pinyin with part four of six. Specifically, you'll cover some potentially tricky pinyin sounds that look completely different on paper, but actually rhyme when you speak them out loud.

Comments (17)

A question about how pinyin is used in china: apart from for pronunciation teaching and learning, is it used in any other ways? For example could they be found next to the characters in lists/menus or on signs?
Acholearn 1 year 11 months ago
That's a great question. You are right, pinyin is mainly used at the beginning stage of learning Chinese for teaching and learning. Chinese people don't really use Pinyin, other than using pinyin to type Chinese. One common place you may find pinyin is on the street names of big cities for people who can't read Chinese. They are usually displayed without tones, as the "English" translation of the street name.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 11 months ago edited
Ok, that's really useful. xie4 xie!
Acholearn 1 year 11 months ago
Thank you! I will remember Pinyin is not English....thank you for explaining about the "false friends", which can catch us learners out when we try to pronounce Pinyin. I will keep coming back to the Pinyin videos over the next few months, so that the "Chinese house(conversational language)" that I build will have very solid foundations!
dreadnought 2 years 7 months ago
Its a little confuse the pronunciation but, with the practice i will improve it! Great lesson Yang Yang.
bryandang1@hotmail.com 3 years 2 months ago
Yes, definitely. Keep up the good works! :)
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 2 months ago
hello yoyo team, would you please demonstrate how the consonant k and h pronounce in Chinese as i am confusing between these one. Thanks.
loiho76 3 years 3 months ago
to follow up with my previous confusion, I would like to know how the h pronounced in Chinese as in Ni3 hao3 (hello)=> "h" is pronounced as h in hotel, but in lesson 9 "I can speak English and a little Chinese" the "h" hui4 + he2 (can + and) in this sentence were NOT pronounced as "h" in Ni3 hao3 or h as in hotel. Why is there another way to pronounce "h" and how would you demonstrate the differences between this one? I am looking forward to hearing from you soon. Thanks.
loiho76 3 years 3 months ago
Yes, "h" is pronounced similar to "h" in hotel, or similar to "her" flat without the emphasis on the "r" sound. It's more close to "he" sound in Chinese. The "h" sound in hui4 and he2 should be the same. Maybe it's the pinyin vowels ui4 and e2 that confused you? Please refer to lessons 5 and 9 for the pinyin vowels pronunciation. We are sorry that it gives you a hard time to distinguish. Let us know if you have any further question.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 3 months ago
Can you pls demonstrate (with image) the positioning of the tongue for the consonants of g,k,h (especially the h sounds), the z,c,s,j,q,x,zh,ch,sh,r? We can hear your voice but do not know exactly where your tongue is positioning in your mouth to create each sound. Thanks
loiho76 3 years 3 months ago
Thanks for your explanation but it still does not satisfy my question as I find it totally different. The "h" in huì and hé sound like "kh" or similar to "k" which I hardly distinguish it. I also found a chine book that mentioned "h" sounds like "kh" as in huì and hé but i do not know how to pronounce it correctly as yours. I also have other questions related to pinyin but it is hard to tell you on the comments box as I need to send files for your review and comment directly on it.Hear fr u soon
loiho76 3 years 3 months ago
Pay attention to the sound and what happens immediately after you say the words, look and lock. The k sound is the sound at the end of these words, when the back of the tongue drops from the palate. This is the closest explanation I can think of.
Valerie 2 years 10 months ago
Thank you for the explanation. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 10 months ago
Maybe the reason why it's sounding different to you in different syllables is because Yangyang really stresses and elongates the sound of the "h" when she's teaching you how to say the words "huì" and "hé" in Beginner Lesson 9. The amount of "rasp" that native speakers use will vary a bit from person to person, and also from word to word. Hope that helps!
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 3 months ago
hmm, this sounds reasonable but the "loch" ending sound, sounds like the "Kě" in lesson 36 BCC I'm glad to meet you. "Wǒ zhīdào Brad Pitt,Kě shì, wǒ bú rèn shi Brad Pitt". The "h" sounds of huì, hé and Kě in these really confuse me.
loiho76 3 years 3 months ago
The "k" sound also might have some "rasp," from time to time, so that's probably why they sound similar to you in those particular instances. Some say the "k" is like the sound of the "ck" plus the following "h" in the words "black hole." We hope this helps.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 3 months ago
Well, the initial "h" really has the same pronunciation in every syllable, which is like the "h" in the word "hand" or "hotel." The only difference is that it has more "friction," than the English "h," so that it sounds a big rougher. Some people call it a "rasp," like the sound at the end of the word "loch."
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 3 months ago
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