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Lesson 16 Pinyin Finals - Part 7

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In part seven of the pinyin final series, continue learning the rest of the finals that start with the letter 'u'. You'll also learn an important tip about a few cases where the 'u' doesn't appear, but is pronounced anyway.
Lesson Audio Review
In part seven of the pinyin final series, continue learning the rest of the finals that start with the letter 'u'. You'll also learn an important tip about a few cases where the 'u' doesn't appear, but is pronounced anyway.

Comments (15)

Am I understanding this correctly? The final o with initial b, p, m, and f is the exact same as the final ou with the initial b, p, m, and f?
lyndsayrae22 1 month 2 weeks ago
b, p, m and o have the "uo" sound behind them. The "u" comes first. Thus, "ou" is the opposite. :-)
pasharain 1 month 2 weeks ago
Hi Lindsay! Actually the two finals 'o' and 'ou' are a bit different! To understand the differences, I would recommend watching this lesson: https://www.yoyochinese.com/learn-Chinese/Mandarin-Chinese-pronunciation... Let me know if you have any questions after that! It can be a little tricky :)
Jason at Yoyo Chinese 1 month 2 weeks ago
Hi! I noticed that my Chinese teacher sometimes pronounces "w" as the English letter "v". For example, instead of wan (uan) she would say "van". Is it some kind of accent?
Billy95 1 year 8 months ago
Yes, a lot of people from the north/northeast of China pronounce the "w" as "v." We suggest that you use the "w" sound when you speak, but it's good that you're being exposed to this variation, since it's so common.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 8 months ago
For the "R" sound, I have also heard it pronounced closer to the English sounding "R" with less of the "CH" sound that your pronounce it with. Is that a dialect issue, and would both be correct? Thanks!
Angel.R 2 years 6 months ago
Please refer to this comment: https://www.yoyochinese.com/comment/3995#comment-3995. Hope that helps. Feel free to let us know if you still have any question.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 6 months ago
Nice to hear the vocab pronounced...heard the same a some of the other guys(dinner etc ) ....have read their questions and the answers provided. Thank you! Every single day I never seem to cease learning something new! Best wishes Carl
dreadnought 2 years 7 months ago
Great to hear. Keep up the good works! :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 7 months ago
" uo " seem to sound more like " wah - mouth open" instead of " wo- pouting mouth " . can just assume it like that ?
LysaShira 2 years 10 months ago
This sound is something in-between the English word "woe" and the "wa" in the English word "war." It starts off with the "pout" and then moves quickly into the "oh" sound.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 10 months ago
I'm trying to understand a little more around the ui (or uei) sound. The sound is described as sound like way and follows that in future lessons with can (hui4) and water (shui3). Where I am confused is when listening to sorry (dui4 bu4 qi3) it sounds more like a dwoy sound rhyming with toy. Any advice on this sound?
daniel.hallam.104 2 years 11 months ago
Hi Daniel, the "duì" in "duì bu qǐ" can sound a little like that when spoken quickly. That's because the "bù" forces the lips back to a rounded position, so the "ei" part at the end of "duì" (which requires a wider, smile-like lip position) gets sort of glossed over.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 11 months ago
Can you help to differentiate the sounds a bit more? For example, to me, shuì (to sleep) and shui (water) sound the same! HELP! :)
FriscoJim 3 years 8 months ago
Sorry to hear that you are having trouble to differentiate the two. shuì (to sleep) is fourth tone, and shui (water) is third tone. Please refer to our pinyin lesson 3 for the different sounds between third and fourth tones. Hope it helps.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 8 months ago
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