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Lesson 14 Pinyin Finals - Part 5

preview
In this lesson, continue learning the pinyin finals and focus on the finals that start with the letter 'o'. There are only three so listen close and make sure you don't miss any!
Lesson Audio Review
In this lesson, continue learning the pinyin finals and focus on the finals that start with the letter 'o'. There are only three so listen close and make sure you don't miss any!

Comments (29)

Curious why Yangyang keeps saying "short AND SWEET"
Gaël Flores 3 months 5 days ago
I am a little confused. In the Pinyin sheet for this lesson and Yangyang say that ou is pronounced like "oh" i.e. oa in boat. However, it sounds like YangYang is pronouncing the chinese word for ugly (chou) like chaugh (the word "chow" in "chow mein") I would appreciate it if you could please clarrify. Thank you
billreich2 1 year 1 month ago
mhm, maybe its cause you aren't used to the tones? It also sounds like the ow in show, so give it a couple more listens and you'll hear more "oh".
Jenny at Yoyo Chinese 1 year 1 month ago
Thank you. I will keep at it.
billreich2 1 year 1 month ago
Great attitude! :)
Jenny at Yoyo Chinese 1 year 1 month ago
Hi YangYang, I see you had a little difficulty in describing the sound of the Chinese "o" as in "long" (dragon). I always think of this Chinese "o" as being like the English "o" in "woman". Do you agree? I am British English so maybe it doesn't work in other accents. By the way I LOVE your method of teaching. Your course should be in every school in the west.
laohaijun 1 year 7 months ago
We are glad that you like Yangyang's teaching method. The "o" in "long" is not pronounced alone. It's group with "ng". "ong" sounds like "oan" in "loan". It may varies a bit with the British accent, but "o" in Chinese sounds just like "aw" in "awesome", not quite like the "o" in "woman". You may spend sometimes on our video-based pinyin chart for demonstration. Hope that helps.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 7 months ago
Just wanted to say, as a British person, your British accent when saying awesome was, well, awesome!!
Dave Ashdown 1 year 8 months ago
Hehe, thanks for the nice words, Dave. :)
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 8 months ago
In the expansion exercises of the audio they say the word for meat - rou - but the r sounds like a "zh". And I have noticed this from other speakers especially for the word for hot - re - where the r sounds like a zh. Is this just due to local accents or should my r's be sounding like that. Thanks!
byu123 1 year 8 months ago
Some native speakers do pronounce the "r" sound a little differently from others, and even within "standard" Mandarin pronunciation, there is some room for slight differences with how much "friction" there is. So in SOME cases it might sound more like the French "j" or even almost like the "s" in the English word "measure" to you, and in OTHER cases it might sound more like the American English "r" to you.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 8 months ago
The most important thing to keep in mind is that when you pronounce the "r" in Chinese, the tongue tip is curled back a little further and has more friction than when you pronounce the American English "r." Also, while the English "r" is always accompanied by lip rounding, the Chinese "r" has lip rounding only when preceding "o" and "u." When it's in front of "a," "e", and "i," the lips are actually spread, not rounded.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 8 months ago
As I traverse the 'ou' row left to right I hear the final that rhymes with 'cow' until I hit zo...then I hear an English 'long o' sound. Is this correct or am I just not hearing it correctly. Sometimes it seems Pinyin just tried to get as much of it correctly as they could but ultimately tradition won over academics. People are not going to speak differently just to make Pinyin 'work' are they?
mec13 1 year 9 months ago
That's right, "ou" sounds like the English "long o" sound, and it does not rhyme with "cow". People are not intentionally to speak differently to make Pinyin "work", but occasionally you may hear it a little different from others due to the many dialect in China. What we are teaching here is the standard Mandarin Pinyin. :)
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 9 months ago
This is my third attempt at learning Mandarin. YY's perspective as a fluent English speaker gives her insight that none of the other Chinese native teachers have. I also think that sometimes (as was pointed out in the hangout with Albert) those without extensive English abilities just don't hear some of the differences that English speakers do. YY's approach of 'speaking first', rigorous attention to Pinyin pronunciation and hr.e smiling personality all make this the best course I have tried.
mec13 1 year 9 months ago
Thank you so much for choosing Yoyo Chinese to continue your Chinese studies, mec13. We really appreciate the nice words. Good luck with your Chinese studies. Feel free to let us know if there's anything we can help you with. Happy studies.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 9 months ago
The simple "o" sound seems that it can only be paired with the consonants that are involved with the lips, "b", "p", "m", and "f". This is very interesting.
Hodge 2 years 1 month ago
You are right. These are the only consonants that pairs with "o".
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 1 month ago
Except for w, as in wo (I)
louisacmcarey 4 months 2 weeks ago
Hi Sometimes I hear 'ou' pronounced as in 'toe' - but also quite often it sounds as if people are saying 'ou' from a bit farther back and lower down in the mouth as in 'told' (pronounced with an English accent). Is this just because people speak with different accents? Are the two sounds interchangeable? Thanks for the help!
Munissara 2 years 7 months ago
Yes, you are right. It may just be due to different accents. It's a bit hard to distinguish the difference between the "ou" sound in "toe" and "told", but it seems to be closer to the "ou" sound in "toe", but shorter. Hope that helps.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 7 months ago
Hey in my previous Chinese studies no-one ever told me you need to put a w sound before the o as in fwaw bwaw. Like the Buddha under the Bo tree, I am now enlightened. Thank you.
xiaolongbao 2 years 11 months ago
Wow, the google hangout video was very helpful! Thanks
Buckett20 3 years 3 weeks ago
Hi Yang Yang, I like your videos very much. Is punctuation mark needed when using pinyin? Is there any difference between dao4 gong1 yuan2 qu4 and qu4 gong1 yuan4? I am having problem pronouncing certain sounds such as qu and chi especially when saying them together like qu4 chi1 fan4. yuetying
Yuet Ying 3 years 2 months ago
We are glad that you like our videos. Yes, tone marks are needed for each pinyin sound. dao4 gong1 yuan2 qu4 and qu4 gong1 yuan2 mean the same. It's more direct to say qu4 gong1 yuan2. We have google hangout lessons that emphasize the pronunciation of q and ch. Please check out google hangout lesson 1 & 2.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 2 months ago
could you please explain or demonstrate the difference in the ch- and sh- pronounciation in "chou" and "shou" in a proper way? many thanks
ploencig 3 years 4 months ago
Yangyang had discussed the pronunciation of ch and sh in her google hangout. Please check out this link:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=if9UTOvQkJo. Hope you find it helpful.
Yoyo Chinese 3 years 4 months ago
hi, pronounciation got problem, how do you say hanyu pinyin rou? i heard zou in the mp3, please help clarify? thanks
fattycat74 3 years 6 months ago
We understand rou is one of the most difficult pinyin to pronounce. Yangyang had discussed the pinyin for r and z in one of her google hangout session. You may see it from the link www.youtube.com/watch?v=if9UTOvQkJo. Hope you find it helpful.
Yoyo Chinese Development 3 years 6 months ago
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